Journal of the Senate

FIRST REGULAR SESSION


THIRD DAY--MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 1997


     The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

     President Wilson in the Chair.

     The Chaplain offered the following prayer:

     Our Father in Heaven, we ask for Divine guidance, safety and health for our governor and other elected officials during this term. We pray that every elected official in our great state be open to Divine wisdom, guidance and counsel. We are thankful for our state, its people and resources. Use all of us to make it even better. In Jesus Name we pray. Amen.

     The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag was recited.

     A quorum being established, the Senate proceeded with its business.

     Senator Quick requested unanimous consent of the Senate that the Senate Journal for Thursday, January 9, 1997, be corrected on page 48, column 2, line 24, by adding after said line the following: "President Pro Tem McKenna referred the above concurrent resolution to the Committee on Rules, Joint Rules and Resolutions.", which request was granted.

     The Journal for Thursday, January 9, 1997, was read and approved, as corrected.

     Senator Quick announced that photographers from the Senate had been given permission to take pictures in the Senate Chamber today.

     The following Senators were present during the day's proceedings:
Present--Senators
BanksBentleyCaskeyChilders
ClayCurlsDePascoEhlmann
GoodeGravesHouseHoward
JacobJohnsonKenneyKinder
KlarichLybyerMathewsonMaxwell
McKennaMuellerQuickRohrbach
RussellSchneiderSimsSingleton
StaplesWestfallWigginsYeckel--32
Absent with leave--Senators
FlotronScott--2
The Lieutenant Governor was present.

RESOLUTIONS

     Senator Bentley offered Senate Resolution No. 13, regarding Mid-America Dairymen, Inc., Springfield, which was adopted.

     Senator Lybyer offered Senate Resolution No. 14, regarding Mr. Robert Emmett Myers, Rolla, which was adopted.

     Senators Mathewson and Goode offered Senate Resolution No. 15, regarding Jerry J. Presley, Jefferson City, which was adopted.

     Senator Staples offered Senate Resolution No. 16, regarding Jan Sisk, Salem, Arkansas, which was adopted.

     Senator Staples, joined by the entire membership of the Senate, offered the following resolution, which was adopted:

SENATE RESOLUTION NO. 17

     WHEREAS, the members of the Missouri Senate are always deeply saddened by the passing of a friend and colleague whose tireless commitment to public service had greatly enhanced the overall effectiveness of state government; and

     WHEREAS, the Honorable Marvin L. Dinger of Pilot Knob departed this life on January 3, 1997, leaving a legacy rich in achievement that will positively affect the lives of countless citizens for many years to come; and

     WHEREAS, born in Ironton on September 30, 1921, Marvin Dinger was educated at the University of Missouri and at Washington University in St. Louis, where he earned his Doctor of Jurisprudence degree; and

     WHEREAS, Marvin Dinger served his country in the U.S. Army Air Corps during World War II from 1943 to 1946 and went on to serve in the U.S. Air Force from 1947 until 1952 before leaving the military with the rank of First Lieutenant; and

     WHEREAS, Marvin Dinger entered the political arena in 1962 with his election as prosecuting attorney of Iron County, after which he commenced an impressive legislative career that took him to the statehouse in Jefferson City; and

     WHEREAS, Mr. Dinger won election to the Missouri House of Representatives from the 128th District in 1964 and served in that legislative body for a total of eight years, during which he earned the faith, confidence, and trust of the people who elected him to represent the 20th District in the Missouri Senate in 1974; and

     WHEREAS, during his eight-year tenure in the Senate, Marvin Dinger distinguished himself through his outstanding leadership as chairman of the influential Judiciary, Criminal Jurisprudence, and Corrections committees; and

     WHEREAS, Mr. Dinger returned to the private practice of law in Iron County in 1982, while maintaining membership in such organizations as St. Paul's Lutheran Church, the Lions Club, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Parent Teachers Association, and the Missouri Bar Association:

     NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that we, the members of the Missouri Senate, Eighty-ninth General Assembly, solemnly pause to reflect upon the lifetime accomplishments of former Senator Marvin L. Dinger as a final tribute to his memory; and

     BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Secretary of the Senate be instructed to prepare a properly inscribed copy of this resolution for the loved ones of the late Marvin L. Dinger, as an expression of our deepest sympathy.

     Senators Goode and Staples offered the following resolution, which was adopted:

SENATE RESOLUTION NO. 18

     WHEREAS, it is with great pride and sincere admiration that the members of the Missouri Senate acknowledge the Eightieth Birthday of an outstanding resident of our state, Leo A. Drey, an environmental philanthropist whose dedication to advancing the cause of appropriate land and water use is unparalleled across the entire United States; and

     WHEREAS, born on January 19, 1917, St. Louis native Leo Drey enjoyed his summer camp experiences in Colorado and New England, adventures which helped nurture his love of the outdoors and the forest and inspire him to choose the most proper and fitting career following his education at Antioch College and a brief term of service at the Wohl Shoe Company in St. Louis; and

     WHEREAS, Leo Drey began acquiring timber land in the southern Ozarks for reforestation in 1950, a project known as Pioneer Forest that currently includes just under 160,000 acres and enjoys distinction as the largest private land holding in the state, larger than the entire state park system; and

     WHEREAS, although a commercial forest, Pioneer Forest is managed in the public interest, employs only selective harvesting techniques, and maintains a detailed computerized inventory of specially-selected plots every five years which gives Pioneer staff a very accurate picture of forest conditions and rates of growth; and

     WHEREAS, an open-air laboratory which has successfully seen a marked improvement in timber quality and overall forest conditions despite nearly fifty years of annual cutting, Pioneer Forest techniques have been studied by federal, state, and other private foresters who seek to learn how to harvest timber without detracting from the aesthetics and long-term viability of the forest and surrounding watersheds; and

     WHEREAS, an avid canoe floater and champion of river and stream protection, Leo Drey founded the L-A-D Foundation which acquires and protects high quality natural areas in the state and leases many of the sites to the Missouri Department of Conservation and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources for $1 annually; and

     WHEREAS, Leo Drey has been known, admired, and respected for many years as the defender and protector of Greer Spring; founder and/or leader of the Missouri Coalition for the Environment, the St. Louis Open Space Council, the Missouri Chapter of the Nature Conservancy, and the Missouri Parks Association; member of many advisory committees, including the School of Natural Resources at the University of Missouri; and president and member of the board of Antioch College:

     NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that we, the members of the Missouri Senate, Eighty-ninth General Assembly, unanimously join in extending our most hearty congratulations to the Godfather of Missouri Conservation, Leo Drey, upon the occasion of his Eightieth Birthday on January 19, 1997, and in wishing him continued success in his honorable and heartfelt quest for excellence in protecting our land and waters; and

     BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Secretary of the Senate be instructed to prepare a properly inscribed copy of this resolution for Mr. Leo Drey.

     Senator Quick moved that the Senate stand in recess, and the Senators repair to the Rotunda of the Capitol where they will meet the House of Representatives in Joint Session to witness the inauguration of the incumbent Governor, Mel Carnahan, and receive his message, which motion prevailed.

JOINT ASSEMBLY

     The Senate and the House of Representatives met in Joint Assembly in the Rotunda of the Capitol and President Pro Tem McKenna called the Joint Assembly to order.

     Governor Mel Carnahan was conducted to his place on the Inaugural Platform by the Legislative Inaugural Committees of the 89th General Assembly.

     Austin Carnahan lead the audience in the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.

     LeAndre Richardson sang the National Anthem.

     The Invocation was offered by Rev. Thomas J. Savage, S.J., President, Rockhurst National Seminars Group.

     Judge John Lyon Anderson, Judge of the 23rd Judicial Circuit Court, administered the oath of office to Attorney General Jeremiah W. (Jay) Nixon.

     Judge Calvin R. Holden, Judge of the 31st Judicial Circuit Court, administered the oath of office to State Treasurer Bob Holden.

     Judge John W. Grimm, Judge of the 32nd Judicial Circuit Court, administered the oath of office to Secretary of State Rebecca McDowell Cook.

     Judge Gene Hamilton, Judge of the 13th Judicial Circuit Court, administered the oath of office to Lieutenant Governor Roger B. Wilson.

     Reading of the Scripture was offered by The Reverend Dr. Robert A. Johnston, Senior Pastor, First Baptist Church, Rolla, Missouri.

     Rabbi Susan Talve, Central Reform Congregation, St. Louis, Missouri, offered the Prayer of Dedication.

     The Honorable Christopher S. Bond, United States Senator, was introduced.

     The Honorable Ike Skelton, Representative, 4th Congressional District, was introduced.

     The Honorable Karen McCarthy, Representative, 5th Congressional District, was introduced.

     The Honorable Jo Ann Emerson, Representative, 8th Congressional District, was introduced.

     The Honorable Ken Hulshof, Representative, 9th Congressional District, was introduced.

     The Honorable Margaret B. Kelly, State Auditor, was introduced.

     Representative Steve Gaw, Speaker of the Missouri House of Representatives, was introduced.

     The Chief Justice, John C. Holstein, and the Judges of the Missouri Supreme Court were introduced.

     Former Governor of Missouri, the Honorable Warren E. Hearnes, was introduced.

     Former Secretary of State, the Honorable James Kirkpatrick, was introduced.

     Veterans' Representative, Medal of Honor Winner, Col. Donald E. Ballard, was introduced.

     Senator Edward E. Quick, Chairman of the Senate Inaugural Committee, and other members of the Committee were introduced.

     Representative May Scheve, Chairman of the House of Representatives Inaugural Committee, and other members of the Committee were introduced.

     Emanuel Cleaver, Mayor of Kansas City, was introduced.

     Freeman Bosley, Jr., Mayor of the City of St. Louis, was introduced.

     Thomas R. Green and James B. Nutter, Sr., Co-Chairmen of the Governor's Honorary Inaugural Committee, and other members of the Committee were introduced.

     Parade Marshal, Cindy Thresher, 1996-97 Teacher of the Year, was introduced.

     Harris-Stowe State College Concert Chorale, arranged and conducted by Dr. Doris Jones Wilson, sang a Patriotic Medley.

     The Honorable Ronnie L. White, Justice of the Missouri Supreme Court, was introduced.

     The oath of office was administered to Governor Mel Carnahan by Justice White. Immediately after administration of the oath, military honors were rendered to Governor Carnahan with the firing of a nineteen gun salute by First Battalion, 128th Field Artillery, Columbia, Missouri.

     Governor Carnahan delivered his Inaugural Address.

Values and Vision: The Summons to a New Century

Governor Mel Carnahan

Jefferson City, Missouri

January 13, 1997

     Two rural school teachers made a lasting impression on me. They were my parents--one a school superintendent; the other an English teacher. Both had a way of going far beyond what was expected of them.

     When they saw youngsters coming to school hungry, they knew that little learning would take place. So they started a hot lunch program. They hauled surplus flour and butter from the railway depot to school in their pickup truck so bread could be made for the students.

     Because my father knew that education was more than reading and writing, he formed a band, and became its leader. He also felt that learning teamwork was important, so he organized a basketball team. Of course, the school couldn't afford a coach, so he took on the extra duty himself.

     And because there were some students who lived out beyond the bus routes and couldn't get to school, my mother and father took those students into our own home to stay during the school year.

     I've thought of my parents often during the past four years as I have served in the office of Governor--the place where I now have the chance to affect the education of Missouri's children.

     I evoke their memory today because who we are, and what we value most comes from the past. Even as we stand here today, we are encircled by the symbols of Missouri's heritage--the capitol...church...courts...and citizens of our state. I am also mindful that we are gathered in a capital city named for one of the great founders of democracy, Thomas Jefferson. We are here today because he--at the turn of a new century--dreamed of a nation that would one day stretch from shore to shore.

     Today we approach our new century.

     A lot has changed--not just from Jefferson's time, but even from the days of my parents when it was a huge undertaking to travel ten miles from home. Today we ride over highways undreamed of back then. One such highway is already transforming our lives--the information super highway. Last month we heard about a new computer that performs a trillion calculations a second; it handles in fifteen seconds what would take someone with a calculator 250,000 years to accomplish.

     We prepare to explore a new era--an era in which learning to operate a computer will be as crucial as it was for our parents' and grandparents' generation to operate a car.

     These generations of Missourians met their challenges and left us a worthy example--they helped America fight and win cruel wars, came home and built the strongest economy the state has ever seen, and sent a message of freedom heard around the world.

     We must not mock their vision with lesser dreams.

     Enriched by their values, inspired by their achievement, we are intent on giving our children the tools and opportunities needed for global living.

     In keeping with that commitment, I will--as my first official act of this new term meet with some students of the high school graduating class of the year 2000.

     To those students and others like them, I pledge not merely to celebrate what we have accomplished, but to dedicate myself to those whose accomplishments are yet to come.

     Such work does not begin today; we have made progress since I stood here four years ago.

     Missouri's economy is strong, with more than 300,000 new jobs.

     We are reforming Missouri's schools, cutting the crime rate, and moving people from welfare rolls to payrolls.

     When disaster struck, in the form of the worst floods the state had seen in hundreds of years, Missourians moved quickly to help their neighbors. We created relocation plans for the future that have already saved millions of tax dollars and much disruption of lives.

     I say all this not just because of the statistics--for there are limits to what numbers can tell us about the daily lives of people.

     I speak of our progress because I have seen it first hand.

     I've seen it in Rogersville, where I went to one of our A+ Schools and spoke with high school seniors who would have been dropouts, and now are being trained for real jobs.

     I've seen it in Nevada, where folks are converting an abandoned building into a telecommunity center. Soon they will be able to use video conferencing and other high tech resources--usually available only in big cities--to compete for new businesses and jobs.

     I've seen it at William Woods University, where a woman who had been on welfare recently came up to me. She was in the FUTURES program--Missouri's superb initiative designed to train able-bodied welfare recipients and get them back on their feet again. This young woman was graduating from college and beginning her new life as a teacher. She pointed to her own two children, two and four years old, and said--"The FUTURES Program not only made a difference for me, it's making a difference for them."

     Yes, we are preparing our people and our state for the 21st century. But much is left to be done.

     The achievements of a generation, like any journey, are made up of small individual steps.

     The most important of these steps will be made hand-in-hand with our children, whose care and future we value more than our own well-being.

     It has been said that: "A child is a person who is going to carry on what you have started. He is going to sit where you are sitting and when you are gone, attend to those things which you think are important. He will assume control of your cities, states and nations. The fate of humanity is in his hands. Teach him well."

     Abraham Lincoln put it this way in one of his earliest of public statements: "I view education as the most important subject which we as a people can be engaged in."

     I think this is what Governor Lon Stevens had in mind at his inaugural exactly a hundred years ago. As he stood on this hilltop, looking into a new century, he reminded Missourians that when it came to our public schools, "nothing should be more carefully guarded or more vigorously promoted."

     What was true in 1897 is equally true in 1997.

     Let there be no doubt--this administration will vigorously promote education, not just with words, but through plans and hard work that translate into achievement.

     To those who know that the skills for the jobs of the 21st Century cannot always be acquired by the 12th grade, we pledge an all-out effort to make grades 13 and 14 as available as a high school diploma is today.

     To those who know that without computer training you cannot find opportunity in the workplace of the century ahead, we pledge this--a state in which every school is linked to the information highway, and equipped with the computers to provide hands-on training for every student.

     Let it be our goal to make every Missouri youngster computer literate by age twelve.

     To those determined that Missouri's colleges and universities maintain their excellent reputation, let me say this--we too, share that resolve. There should be no company locating in another state because workers with the skills needed by new businesses were unavailable within our borders.

     Reaching new levels of excellence will not be easy for any of us. The difficulty of educating a child is apparent to anyone who has sat with a son or daughter over algebra homework, or tried to persuade them to turn off Nintendo 64 to read a book.

     Education doesn't just happen in the classroom. It happens in the home. It occurs when schools are safe. It comes when students are healthy and well-nourished.

     And so, we further pledge that we will create the surroundings in which education can flourish, where schools are free of guns, gangs and drugs, and where learning is enhanced by good health and nutrition.

     And because we know that learning begins long before school ever starts, we are expanding our nationally recognized Parents as Teachers initiative and support for early childhood education. We must make Missouri a state in which every child goes to school healthy, immunized and ready to learn.

     A while back, as I toured a school with the local superintendent, he explained his approach to education. "We want to leave no child behind," he told me as he proudly pointed out the extra effort his community was putting forth to keep children in school and excited by learning.

     His is a fitting goal for all of us. We must improve learning in all our schools, from Hayti to Hannibal; Eminence to Independence; St. Joseph to St. Louis.

     Economically and socially, we cannot afford a Missouri of educational haves and have-nots.

     We must leave no child behind. If we are to embrace the future, we must first embrace the child.

     This cannot be the mission of government alone. Nor can it be accomplished only with dollars and hardware.

     So, I urge new partnerships to begin between government and business and communities that will forge new endeavors. Surely, the education of our children is too important to remain the province of one party or one administration. We seek, we need the abilities and insights of all. Only then can we thrive as a people.

     We in this age of technology know that the finest computers will help us realize our aims only if those using them are instilled with the values and vision on which our state and nation have been built.

     This is truly our greatest challenge as we are summoned by a new century. One that calls for bold plans and courageous deeds.

     May we not approach this new era with faltering steps or flinching spirit.

     Rather, let us go forth hand in hand, like partners in a great adventure. Girded in faith, made strong by hope, firm in the knowledge that He who directs the course of the universe as well as the flight of the sparrow, will guide us in a sure and certain path.

     And generations from now, when the balloons and bunting are gone, and when our speeches are shelved in the archives, those who are children now will remember our deeds. May they look back and say, we preserved the future for them.

     Let them say, too, that Missouri, once the gateway to the frontier, opened a gateway to the future. And in that new era, may we be guided not only by innovation and enterprise, but by virtues as timeless as those taught by those two Ozarks school teachers who shaped my life more than half a century ago.

     Harris-Stowe State College Concert Chorale sang the Battle Hymn of the Republic.

     The Benediction was pronounced by Pastor Sammie E. Jones, Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church, St. Louis, Missouri.

     The audience remained standing, and Governor Carnahan was escorted from the platform by the Legislative Inaugural Committee.

     President Pro Tem of the Senate, Senator William P. McKenna, adjourned the Joint Session of the 89th General Assembly. Immediately thereafter the University of Missouri-Columbia Symphonic Band, directed by L. Kevin Kastens performed.

     On motion of President Pro Tem McKenna, the Joint Assembly dissolved.

     The Senators returned to the Chamber and the Senate was called to order by Senator Howard.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

     The following Bills were read the 1st time and 1,000 copies ordered printed:

     SB 205--By Yeckel.

     An Act to amend chapter 566, RSMo, by adding thereto three new sections relating to sex offenders, with penalty provisions.

     SB 206--By Yeckel.

     An Act to amend chapter 304, RSMo, by adding one new section relating to school bus operation, with an effective date.

     On motion of Senator Quick, the Senate recessed until 2:00 p.m.

RECESS

     The time of recess having expired, the Senate was called to order by Senator Johnson.

SECOND READING OF SENATE BILLS

     The following Bills were read the 2nd time and referred to the Committees indicated:

     SB 1--Judiciary.

     SB 2--Judiciary.

     SB 3--Aging, Families and Mental Health.

     SB 4--Ways and Means.

     SB 5--Ways and Means.

     SB 6--Financial and Governmental Organization.

     SB 7--Ways and Means.

     SB 8--Judiciary.

     SB 9--Corrections and General Laws.

     SB 10--Corrections and General Laws.

     SB 11--Local Government and Economic Development.

     SB 12--Ways and Means.

     SB 13--Public Health and Welfare.

     SB 14--Civil and Criminal Jurisprudence.

     SB 15--Ways and Means.

     SB 16--Ethics.

     SB 17--Corrections and General Laws.

     SB 18--Agriculture, Conservation, Parks and Tourism.

     SB 19--Transportation.

     SB 20--Local Government and Economic Development.

     SB 21--Local Government and Economic Development.

     SB 22--Appropriations.

     SB 23--Public Health and Welfare.

     SB 24--Insurance and Housing.

     SB 25--Insurance and Housing.

     SB 26--Elections, Pensions and Veterans' Affairs.

     SB 27--Elections, Pensions and Veterans' Affairs.

     SB 28--Transportation.

     SB 29--Interstate Cooperation.

     SB 30--Education.

     SB 31--Commerce and Environment.

     SB 32--Civil and Criminal Jurisprudence.

     SB 33--Labor and Industrial Relations.

     SB 34--Agriculture, Conservation, Parks and Tourism.

     SB 35--Ways and Means.

     SB 36--Civil and Criminal Jurisprudence.

     SB 37--Civil and Criminal Jurisprudence.

     SB 38--Aging, Families and Mental Health.

     SB 39--Elections, Pensions and Veterans' Affairs.

     SB 40--Elections, Pensions and Veterans' Affairs.

     SB 41--Ways and Means.

     SB 42--Commerce and Environment.

     SB 43--Transportation.

     SB 44--Ways and Means.

     SB 45--Ethics.

     SB 46--Corrections and General Laws.

     SB 47--Commerce and Environment.

     SB 48--Commerce and Environment.

     SB 49--Civil and Criminal Jurisprudence.

     SB 50--Corrections and General Laws.

     SB 51--Corrections and General Laws.

     SB 53--Civil and Criminal Jurisprudence.

     SB 54--Judiciary.

     SB 55--Labor and Industrial Relations.

     SB 56--Judiciary.

     SB 57--Corrections and General Laws.

     SB 58--Local Government and Economic Development.

     SB 59--Transportation.

     SB 60--Labor and Industrial Relations.

     SB 61--Insurance and Housing.

     SB 62--Transportation.

     SB 63--Agriculture, Conservation, Parks and Tourism.

     SB 64--Education.

     SB 65--Financial and Governmental Organization.

     SB 66--Public Health and Welfare.

     SB 67--Transportation.

     SB 68--Ways and Means.

     SB 69--Transportation.

     SB 70--Corrections and General Laws.

     SB 71--Commerce and Environment.

     SB 72--Commerce and Environment.

     SB 73--Commerce and Environment.

     SB 74--Civil and Criminal Jurisprudence.

     SB 75--Civil and Criminal Jurisprudence.

MESSAGES FROM THE GOVERNOR

     The following messages were received from the Governor, reading of which was waived:

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

State of Missouri

Jefferson City, Missouri

January 9, 1997

TO THE SENATE OF THE 89th GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI:

     I have the honor to transmit to you herewith for your advice and consent the following appointment to office:

     Michael D. Baker, 1 Dogwood Drive, Warrenton, Warren County, Missouri 63383, as a member of the Peace Officers Standards and Training Commission, for a term ending October 3, 1999, and until his successor is duly appointed and qualified; vice, reappointment.

Respectfully submitted,

MEL CARNAHAN

Governor

     Also,

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

State of Missouri

Jefferson City, Missouri

January 9, 1997

TO THE SENATE OF THE 89th GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI:

     I have the honor to transmit to you herewith for your advice and consent the following appointment to office:

     Colleen K. Conrad, 7701 Kenridge Lane, St. Louis, St. Louis County, Missouri 63119, as a member of the Missouri State Board of Accountancy, for a term ending July 1, 2001, and until her successor is duly appointed and qualified; vice, Karyn Molnar, term expired.

Respectfully submitted,

MEL CARNAHAN

Governor

     Also,

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

State of Missouri

Jefferson City, Missouri

January 9, 1997

TO THE SENATE OF THE 89th GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI:

     I have the honor to transmit to you herewith for your advice and consent the following appointment to office:

     Josephine L. Emerick, 14051 Calcutta Drive, Chesterfield, St. Louis County, Missouri 63017, as a member of the Missouri Board for Architects, Professional Engineers and Land Surveyors, for a term ending September 1, 2000, and until her successor is duly appointed and qualified; vice, Thomas E. Barta, term expired.

Respectfully submitted,

MEL CARNAHAN

Governor

     Also,

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

State of Missouri

Jefferson City, Missouri

January 9, 1997

TO THE SENATE OF THE 89th GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI:

     I have the honor to transmit to you herewith for your advice and consent the following appointment to office:

     Lynn M. Ewing, Jr., Democrat, 146 Country Club Drive, Nevada, Vernon County, Missouri 64772, as a member of the Coordinating Board for Higher Education, for a term ending June 27, 2002, and until his successor is duly appointed and qualified; vice, Dr. L.M. Magruder, term expired.

Respectfully submitted,

MEL CARNAHAN

Governor

     Also,

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

State of Missouri

Jefferson City, Missouri

January 9, 1997

TO THE SENATE OF THE 89th GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI:

     I have the honor to transmit to you herewith for your advice and consent the following appointment to office:

     James T. Mudd, 1080 Meadowbrook, Troy, Lincoln County, Missouri 63379, as a member of the Missouri State Board of Accountancy, for a term ending July 1, 2001, and until his successor is duly appointed and qualified; vice, Jeffrey S. Smith, term expired.

Respectfully submitted,

MEL CARNAHAN

Governor

     Also,

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

State of Missouri

Jefferson City, Missouri

January 9, 1997

TO THE SENATE OF THE 89th GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI:

     I have the honor to transmit to you herewith for your advice and consent the following appointment to office:

     Robert A. Pearson, 3 Briar Point, Kansas City, Clay County, Missouri 64116, as a member of the Missouri State Board of Accountancy, for a term ending July 1, 2000, and until his successor is duly appointed and qualified; vice, James A. Olson, term expired.

Respectfully submitted,

MEL CARNAHAN

Governor

     President Pro Tem McKenna referred the above appointments to the Committee on Gubernatorial Appointments.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

     The following Bills and Joint Resolution were read the 1st time and 1,000 copies ordered printed:

     SB 207--By Maxwell.

     An Act to amend chapter 178, RSMo, by adding one new section relating to postsecondary educational consortia.

     SB 208--By Maxwell.

     An Act to repeal section 41.435, RSMo 1994, and section 173.239, RSMo Supp. 1996, relating to the Missouri national guard, and to enact in lieu thereof two new sections relating to the same subject.

     SB 209--By Maxwell.

     An Act to repeal sections 375.007 and 379.114, RSMo 1994, relating to the issuance of insurance policies and to enact in lieu thereof two new sections relating to the same subject.

     SJR 7--By Maxwell.

     Joint Resolution submitting to the qualified voters of Missouri, an amendment repealing section 27 of article VI of the constitution of Missouri relating to joint municipal utility commission revenue bonds, and adopting one new section in lieu thereof relating to the same subject.

MESSAGES FROM THE HOUSE

     The following messages were received from the House of Representatives through its Chief Clerk:

     Mr. President: I am instructed by the House of Representatives to inform the Senate that the Speaker has appointed the following Representatives to escort the Chief Justice pursuant to HCR 1. Representatives: May (108), Bauer, Parker, Thompson, Wilson, Bray, Gibbons, Patek, Hendrickson.

     Also,

     Mr. President: I am instructed by the House of Representatives to inform the Senate that the Speaker has appointed the following Representatives to escort the Governor pursuant to HCR 2. Representatives: Lakin, McLuckie, Scheve, Smith, Gunn, Gratz, Kauffman, Ostmann, Greisheimer, Vogel.

     Also,

     Mr. President: I am instructed by the House of Representatives to inform the Senate that the Speaker has appointed the following Representatives pursuant to SCR 2. Representatives: Scheve, Gaw, Kreider, Backer, Crump, Days, Murray, Thompson, Williams (121), Tate, McBride, Wiggins, Richardson, Lograsso, Shields, Scott, Froelker, Kauffman.

COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS

     President Pro Tem McKenna appointed the following committees:

     Administrative Rules: Senators Howard and Ehlmann.

     Legislative Research: Senators Caskey, DePasco, Flotron, Mueller, Rohrbach and Russell.

INTRODUCTIONS OF GUESTS

     Senator Klarich introduced to the Senate, his daughters, Rachel and Elsa, Ballwin; and Rachel and Elsa were made honorary pages.

     Senator Goode introduced to the Senate, Leslie Hogshead, Rev. Milton Mitchell, Sr., Debra Smith, and students from McCluer High School, Florissant; and Matthew Geiger, Erin Hogshead, Michael Mitchell, Tameka Smith and Eileen Webber were made honorary pages.

     Senator Mathewson introduced to the Senate, Mark Kempton and his son, Brody, and Adam and Joyce Fischer, Sedalia; and Brody was made an honorary page.

     Senator McKenna introduced to the Senate, his brothers and their wives, Don and Kim McKenna, Dennis and Terri McKenna, St. Louis; and Kevin and Patti McKenna, Jefferson County.

     Senator Howard introduced to the Senate, his wife Shirla, Dexter; his son and daughter-in-law, John and Sara Howard, St. Louis; his daughter, Eliza Howard and Allen Winfrey, Little Rock, Arkansas; F.A. and Mary Findley, Poplar Bluff; John and Patti Shell, Pat Batten, Carrol Chaney, Deloris Wamble, Jamie and Amy Cook, Kenneth and Debbie Essner, Ron and Sheila Legrand, Dexter; Karen Patterson, Dudley; Regina Jolly, Portageville; Norma Cecil, Malden; Wendell, Pat and Lori Hoskins and Wendell Hoskins, II, Steele; Helen Lafferty, Cooter; Frank Sifford, Bloomfield; Dilip Kakaiya and Nick Robinson, Kennett; Bobby Powell, and Jean and Steven VanAusdall, Caruthersville.

     Senator Staples introduced to the Senate, his wife, Barbara, Eminence; and Phillip Horn, Allen Wells, Bill Beckerman, Mark Jones, Cathy, Kim and Carolyn Tyler, St. Francois County.

     Senator Caskey introduced to the Senate, Mary James, Harrisonville; and Greg Lee, Lake Winnebago.

     Senator Banks introduced to the Senate, his wife, Anita, Anne Marie Clarke, Dr. Henry Given and Odel McGowan, St. Louis.

     Senator Maxwell introduced to the Senate, Carla Ball, Kahoka.

     Senator Kinder introduced to the Senate, Norma and Walt Wildman, Cape Girardeau.

     Senator Sims introduced to the Senate, Norman B. Champ, Ladue.

     The President introduced to the Senate, former Lieutenant Governor, Harriet Woods.

     Senator Staples introduced to the Senate, Michelle, Brandon and Marissa Turner, and Lisa Dillard, Jefferson City; and Marissa was made an honorary page.

     Senator Wiggins introduced to the Senate, Mark Fendler and Nissa Isselhard, Kansas City.

     On motion of Senator Quick, the Senate adjourned under the rules.