SB 65
Modifies provisions relating to persons knowingly infected with communicable diseases
Sponsor:
LR Number:
0507S.04C
Committee:
Last Action:
5/7/2021 - Informal Calendar S Bills for Perfection w/SCS
Journal Page:
Title:
SCS SB 65
Calendar Position:
Effective Date:
August 28, 2021

Current Bill Summary

SCS/SB 65 - Under current law, it is illegal for a person knowingly infected with HIV to donate blood, organs, tissue, or sperm, unless for medical research, as well as illegal for such person to act recklessly in exposing another person to HIV without their knowledge and consent.

This act modifies those provisions to make it unlawful for a person knowingly infected with a serious infectious or communicable disease to: (1) donate blood, organs, tissue, or sperm, unless for medical research or as deemed medically appropriate by a licensed physician; (2) knowingly expose another person to the disease through an activity that creates a substantial risk of transmission; or (3) act in a reckless manner by exposing another person to the disease through an activity that creates a substantial risk of disease transmission. A "serious infectious or communicable disease" is defined as a non-airborne disease spread from person to person that is fatal or causes disabling long-term consequences in the absence of lifelong treatment and management. The penalty for donation of blood, organs, tissue, or sperm while knowingly infected with the disease or knowingly exposing another person to the disease shall be a Class D felony, rather than the current Class B felony, and a Class C felony, rather than the current Class A felony, if the victim contracts the disease. The penalty for recklessly exposing another person is a Class A misdemeanor.

It shall be an affirmative defense to this offense if the person exposed to the disease knew that the infected person was infected with the disease at the time of the exposure and consented to the exposure.

This act specifies the actions to be taken during a judicial proceeding to protect the identifying information of the victim and the defendant from public release, except as otherwise specified. Additionally, this act changes similar provisions involving exposure of persons in correctional centers, jails, or certain mental health facilities to HIV or hepatitis B or C to exposure to a serious infectious or communicable disease when the nature of the exposure to the bodily fluid has been scientifically shown to be a means of transmission of the disease.

This act is similar to HB 1691 (2020).

SARAH HASKINS

Amendments

No Amendments Found.