SB 764 Allows voters in fourth class cities to propose ordinances via initiative petition and provides a procedure for voters in such cities to protest the passage of ordinances
Sponsor: Lager
LR Number: 4375S.01I Fiscal Note available
Committee: Jobs, Economic Development and Local Government
Last Action: 3/5/2014 - Hearing Conducted S Jobs, Economic Development and Local Government Committee Journal Page:
Title: Calendar Position:
Effective Date: August 28, 2014

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Current Bill Summary


SB 764 - This act allows voters in fourth class cities to propose ordinances via initiative petition. In order for a petition to be certified by the city clerk, it must be signed by at least ten percent of the city's registered voters voting for mayor at the last municipal election. Once the petition has been certified by the clerk, the board of aldermen must either pass the ordinance or submit the question of whether to pass the ordinance to the voters at the next municipal election, unless the petition has been signed by 25 percent or more of the registered voters, in which case the board of aldermen must immediately submit the question. The ordinance is enacted if it receives approval from a majority of the voters. Ordinances enacted via initiative petition cannot be repealed or amended except by a vote of the people.

This act also provides a procedure for voters in fourth class cities to protest the passage of ordinances. Under this act, most ordinances do not take effect for ten days after passage. During that ten-day period, voters may submit a petition signed by at least 25 percent of the registered voters of the city to the board of aldermen in protest against the passage of the ordinance. If a petition is submitted, the ordinance is suspended from taking effect and the board of aldermen must reconsider the ordinance. If the ordinance is not entirely repealed, the board of aldermen must submit the ordinance to a vote and the ordinance only takes effect upon receiving approval from a majority of the voters.

This act is similar to a provision of the truly agreed to and finally passed CCS#2/HCS/SCS/SB 672 (2014) and SB 967 (2014).

MEGHAN LUECKE