SB 679 Modifies laws regarding educational parental support for higher education
Sponsor: Curls
LR Number: 4898S.01I Fiscal Note available
Committee: Seniors, Families and Pensions
Last Action: 2/18/2014 - Hearing Cancelled S Seniors, Families and Pensions Committee Journal Page:
Title: Calendar Position:
Effective Date: August 28, 2014

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Current Bill Summary


SB 679 - This act modifies the laws regarding educational parental support for higher education. The provision in Section 452.340 regarding child support for higher education is repealed and a new Section 452.339 is created.

Under this act, a court is allowed to order either or both parents owing a duty of support to provide for the educational expenses of their child whether he or she is of minor or majority age until the child completes his or her education, but no later than when the child reaches 23 years of age. Also, the court cannot be prevented from requiring the child to be responsible for a portion of his or her educational expenses.

An application for educational expenses shall be made before or within 120 days of graduation from high school or completion of an equivalent program, or upon reaching 18 years of age, whichever is later. The educational expenses may include among other things, room, board, dues, tuition, and living expenses during the school year and periods of recess.

The act specifies the requirements the child must meet to remain eligible for continued support and the factors the court must consider when determining the amount awarded. The expenses may be ordered payable to the child, either parent, or to an educational institution directly or through a special account or trust created for such purposes.

This act also requires any amount contributed to the child or received by the child from scholarships or other specified financial aid to be deducted prior to determining the amount of the parents' responsibility.

This act is identical to SB 225 (2013) and substantially similar to HB 1914 (2012).

ADRIANE CROUSE