Journal of the Senate

FIRST REGULAR SESSION


EIGHTH DAY--WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2003


The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

President Maxwell in the Chair.

Reverend Carl Gauck offered the following prayer:

"Time and fire have the same effect." (Henry David Thoreau)

Gracious God, help us be sensitive to what You want us to do; that our activities and decisions are in accord with Your will for us so that we may effectively impact the lives of our people for the better. And Lord, we pray for our fellow Missourians who have been called up to serve and protect our country; watch over them and bless those who are put in harm's way. In Your Holy Name we pray. Amen.

The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag was recited.

A quorum being established, the Senate proceeded with its business.

The Journal of the previous day was read and approved.

Senator Gibbons announced that photographers from TV23-Springfield had been given permission to take pictures in the Senate Chamber today.

The following Senators were present during the day's proceedings:

Present--Senators
Bartle Bland Bray Caskey
Cauthorn Champion Childers Clemens
Coleman Days DePasco Dolan
Dougherty Foster Gibbons Goode
Griesheimer Gross Jacob Kennedy
Kinder Klindt Loudon Mathewson
Nodler Quick Russell Scott
Shields Steelman Stoll Vogel
Wheeler Yeckel--34
Absent with leave--Senators--None
The Lieutenant Governor was present.


RESOLUTIONS

Senator Caskey offered Senate Resolution No. 55, regarding Gerald L. "Jerry" Manford, Basehor, Kansas, which was adopted.

Senator Steelman offered Senate Resolution No. 56, regarding Linda K. Shockley, Auxvasse, which was adopted.

Senator Cauthorn offered Senate Resolution No. 57, regarding the Northeast Missouri Rural Telephone Company (NEMR), Green City, which was adopted.

Senator Cauthorn offered Senate Resolution No. 58, regarding J. Brent Engel, Louisiana, which was adopted.

Senator Vogel offered Senate Resolution No. 59, regarding Lucas E. Vogel, Jefferson City, which was adopted.

Senator Vogel offered Senate Resolution No. 60, regarding Brent Butzer Dulle, Jefferson City, which was adopted.

Senator Vogel offered Senate Resolution No. 61, regarding Michael Schwarzer, Jefferson City, which was adopted.

Senator Vogel offered Senate Resolution No. 62, regarding Carl G. Bynum, D.O., Jefferson City, which was adopted.

Senator Klindt offered Senate Resolution No. 63, regarding the Fiftieth Wedding Anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Clark, Mercer, which was adopted.

Senator Klindt offered Senate Resolution No. 64, regarding Matthew Chambers, Trenton, which was adopted.

Senator Klindt offered Senate Resolution No. 65, regarding the Fiftieth Wedding Anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Gilgour, Hamilton, which was adopted.

Senator Klindt offered Senate Resolution No. 66, regarding Andy and Dana Kapp, Clarksdale, which was adopted.

Senator Klindt offered Senate Resolution No. 67, regarding the Fiftieth Wedding Anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Baker, Hamilton, which was adopted.

Senator Loudon offered Senate Resolution No. 68, regarding Harry Bozoian, D.D.S., St. Louis County, which was adopted.

Senator Loudon offered Senate Resolution No. 69, regarding Gordon C. Thompson, D.D.S., Chesterfield, which was adopted.

Senator Bray offered Senate Resolution No. 70, regarding Marvin Wallach, D.D.S., Olivette, which was adopted.

MESSAGES FROM THE HOUSE

The following messages were received from the House of Representatives through its Chief Clerk:

Mr. President: I am instructed by the House of Representatives to inform the Senate that the Speaker has appointed the following Representatives to act with a like committee from the Senate pursuant to HCR 2. Representatives Smith (14), Munzlinger, Dethrow, Angst, Ruestman, Brown, Johnson (61), Johnson (90), Meiners and Merideth.

Also,

Mr. President: I am instructed by the House of Representatives to inform the Senate that the Speaker has appointed the following escort committee for the Lieutenant Governor and Senators attending the State of the Judiciary address Representatives Quinn, Shoemaker, Johnson (47), Smith (118), Self, Pearce, El-Amin, Hampton, Harris (110), and Walsh.

COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS

President Pro Tem Kinder appointed the following committee pursuant to HCR 2: Senators Yeckel, Dolan, Bartle, Loudon, Kinder, Goode, Wheeler, Days, Jacob and Bray.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS

The following Bills were read the 1st time and 1,000 copies ordered printed:

SB 306-By Steelman.

An Act to repeal section 452.423, RSMo, and to enact in lieu thereof one new section relating to guardian ad litem.

SB 307-By Steelman.

An Act to repeal section 208.565, RSMo, and to enact in lieu thereof one new section relating to the senior Rx program, with an emergency clause.

SB 308-By Steelman.

An Act to amend chapter 34, RSMo, by adding thereto one new section relating to the Missouri calcium initiative, with an emergency clause and expiration date.

SB 309-By Caskey.

An Act to amend chapter 640, RSMo, by adding thereto one new section relating to the department of natural resources.

SB 310-By Caskey.

An Act to repeal sections 347.700, 347.720, 358.150, 358.520, and 359.165, RSMo, and to enact in lieu thereof five new sections relating to business organizations.

SB 311-By Dougherty, Bray, Jacob, Coleman, Days, Kennedy, Goode, Wheeler and Bland.

An Act to repeal sections 197.317, 197.318, 198.018, 198.022, 198.032, 198.036, 198.067, 198.070, 198.090, 198.093, 198.525, 198.526, 198.532, 208.159, 210.903, 210.909, 210.933, 210.936, 344.050, 565.186, 565.188, 565.190, 660.050, 660.058, 660.270, 660.300, 660.305, 660.315, 660.317, and 660.320, RSMo, and to enact in lieu thereof forty-three new sections relating to protection of the elderly, with penalty provisions.

SB 312-By Dolan, Foster, Yeckel and Loudon.

An Act to repeal section 565.020, RSMo, and to enact in lieu thereof one new section relating to offenses against the person, with penalty provisions.

SB 313-By Dolan.

An Act to amend chapter 287, RSMo, by adding thereto one new section relating to law enforcement officers' health impairment.

SB 314-By Dolan.

An Act to repeal section 304.157 as enacted by senate bill no. 17, ninetieth general assembly, first regular session, relating to abandoned property.

SB 315-By Steelman.

An Act to amend chapter 10, RSMo, by adding thereto one new section relating to the establishment of an official state grass.

SB 316-By Kennedy.

An Act to amend chapters 335 and 376, RSMo, by adding thereto two new sections relating to registered nurse first assistants.

Senator Gibbons moved that the Senate recess to repair to the House of Representatives to receive a message from the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, the Honorable Stephen N. Limbaugh, Jr., which motion prevailed.

JOINT SESSION

The Joint Session was called to order by President Maxwell.

On roll call the following Senators were present:

Present--Senators
Bartle Bland Bray Caskey
Cauthorn Champion Childers Clemens
Coleman Days Dolan Dougherty
Foster Gibbons Goode Griesheimer
Gross Jacob Kennedy Kinder
Klindt Loudon Mathewson Nodler
Russell Scott Shields Steelman
Stoll Vogel Wheeler Yeckel--32
Absent--Senators
DePasco Quick--2
Absent with leave--Senators--None

On roll call the following Representatives were present:

Present--Representatives
Abel Adams Angst Avery
Baker Barnitz Bean Bearden
Behnen Bishop Bivins Black
Bland Bough Boykins Bringer
Brooks Brown Bruns Burnett
Byrd Campbell Carnahan Cooper 120
Cooper 155 Corcoran Crawford Crowell
Cunningham 145 Cunningham 86 Curls Darrough
Daus Davis 122 Davis 19 Deeken
Dempsey Dethrow Dixon Donnelly
Dougherty Dusenberg El-Amin Emery
Engler Ervin Fares Fraser
George Goodman Graham Green
Guest Hampton Harris 110 Harris 23
Haywood Henke Hilgemann Hobbs
Hoskins Hubbard Hunter Icet
Jackson Jetton Johnson 47 Johnson 61
Johnson 90 Jolly Jones Kelly 144
Kelly 36 King Kingery Kratky
Kuessner Lager Lembke LeVota
Liese Lipke Lowe Luetkemeyer
Marsh May 149 Mayer 159 McKenna
Meiners Merideth Miller Moore
Morris Muckler Munzlinger Myers
Nieves Page Parker Pearce
Phillips Portwood Pratt Quinn
Ransdall Rector Richard Roark
Ruestman Rupp Sager Salva
Sander Schaaf Schlottach Schneider
Schoemehl Seigfreid Selby Self
Shoemaker Shoemyer Skaggs Smith 118
Smith 14 Spreng Stefanick Stevenson
Sutherland Taylor Thompson Threlkeld
Townley Viebrock Villa Vogt
Walker Wallace Walsh Walton
Ward Wasson Whorton Wildberger
Willoughby Wilson 119 Wilson 130 Wilson 25
Wilson 42 Witte Wood Wright
Yaeger Yates Young Zweifel
Madam Speaker--157
Absent and Absent with Leave--Representatives
Holand Lawson Purgason Reinhart
St. Onge Wagner--6

The Joint Committee appointed to wait upon the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Stephen N. Limbaugh, Jr., escorted the Chief Justice to the dais where he delivered the State of the Judiciary Address to the Joint Assembly:

The State of the Judiciary

Address of Chief Justice Stephen N. Limbaugh, Jr.

to the

92nd General Assembly, First Regular Session

January 22, 2003

President Maxwell, Speaker Hanaway, distinguished members of the Senate and House of Representatives. Let me begin with introductions of two of my colleagues on the Supreme Court. The first is Judge Richard Teitelman, our newest judge, who took office last March, after three years of service on the Court of Appeals in St. Louis, and 18 years as a legal aid lawyer, selflessly representing low-income citizens. Although Judge Teitelman is sight-impaired, he compensates by working day and night, with little sleep, and as the other judges will tell you, his caseload is the most current on the Court. In addition, he brings a personal kindness and graciousness that enhances the collegiality of a Court that already prides itself on its collegiality.

The other introduction is my friend Judge Ronnie White, who, on July 1, will take over my duties as chief justice as I complete my two-year rotation and he begins his. One hundred fifty years after Missouri's landmark Dred Scott case, which precipitated the Civil War, and in turn, the end of slavery, and the struggle for civil rights that followed, it is high time that an African-American is represented in the office of Chief Justice. And to that, I add that Judge White will be the first chief justice in 34 years who also has served in the legislature.

Last year at this time, you greeted me warmly, and many of you expressed to me that you appreciated my emphasis on the honor of public service. But it was also clear that my speech was well received because I didn't ask for money! Nor will I ask for money this year, knowing that the budget crisis is even worse. There is one exception: For the 3,000 or so court employees - court clerks and secretaries and juvenile officers - the people who staff the courthouses in our 114 counties and the City of St. Louis, the people who are the public's first and sometimes most critical contact with the court system, the people who keep the court records and process the data in the computers and who assist lawyers and litigants and the general public alike, the people who collect and process the myriad of fees and fines and child support payments and the like, the people who over years of dedicated service have worked themselves up a state pay grid that starts at just $17,000 per year, the people who for two years running have not had a raise in pay and whose take-home pay has actually been reduced because of increased insurance premiums - for those people I ask your help. I ask nothing for judges, but I ask you to find the means to help those whose work allows the judges to administer justice.

In view of the budget crisis, the Court is attempting to fashion its own proactive solutions by securing alternative sources of funding for one of its most important administrative efforts, the ongoing and immensely successful court automation program. For those of you who are new to the General Assembly, the court automation program is, in a word, the "computerization" of the judicial system, and its purpose is to give courts greater capacity to manage caseloads, to provide the general public with instant access to all public court records, and to improve essential communication between courts, law enforcement agencies, and other executive branch entities. The infrastructure has been completed statewide, and case management software is being used in about half of the courts. Although the original intent was to bring the remaining courts into the statewide system within the next few years, budget cuts have placed the program on hold. One exception is the 16th Judicial Circuit in Jackson County which, after a review of the several case management software programs throughout the country, decided to invest its own funds to expand its use of the state system. In fact, this alternative funding approach, which does not require state general revenue, has potential for other urban circuits as well, such as the City of St. Louis, where talks are underway for implementation of a project similar to that in Kansas City.

Some of you, particularly those who are lawyers, may have used the system's internet access called Case.Net, which is built on the case management software, and know full well that the promise of the court automation program - instant electronic access to court records open to the public - is now being met. The rest of you will find that you can access with ease everything from the courts' docket entries in any given case, to a judge's entire court calendar. And, for me, as one whose computer skills are far from proficient, the true test of the product is that even I can use it!

The Case.Net system was not the work of any vendor, but the result of the creativity and ingenuity of the employees of the Office of State Courts Administrator. You should know, too, that that creativity and ingenuity has been recognized on a national level. Just last summer, Case.Net received the "Best of Breed Award" from the Center for Digital Government, a think-tank of experts in the use of information technology at all levels of government. Indeed, Case.Net was one of 30 programs selected from more than 1,500 entries nationwide. Additionally, we recently received word that the court automation program was designated as a Computerworld Honors Program Laureate. This prestigious award means that the court automation program will be on file and available for study at such renowned institutions as Oxford, Harvard, MIT, and the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History.

To be sure, the automation of the courts, which the legislature has strongly supported over the years, is bearing fruit for our Missouri citizens and serves as a model for the country. We are especially grateful to Senator Klindt and Representative Crowell, who have attended nearly every meeting of the statutory court automation committee since their appointment and who provide invaluable legislative input and oversight.

If the crisis with the budget is the most pressing concern of the General Assembly, the crisis in juvenile justice undoubtedly will command a good deal of your attention as well. At the outset, it is our pledge that we, the judges of this state, will do all in our power to correct the failures in the system whether or not those failures are of our own making. Investigations into alleged mishandling of juvenile court cases have been conducted by both the Governor's office and the Senate, and the reports have been submitted. A third investigation - a DFS performance audit by State Auditor Claire McCaskill - is pending, and I am grateful to her for affording me a preview of her findings. Although most of the focus has been on the Division of Family Services, I regret that in certain cases we judges have come under fire for being heavy-handed in the removal of children from their homes, for failing to provide timely hearings to the parents and families of those children who have been removed, and for failing to require the communication and cooperation between the courts and DFS necessary to protect the children. Whether the truth of the allegations is perception or reality, the unfortunate result, of course, is public distrust and a lack of confidence in the system.

Now that investigations have been made and problems have been identified, it is time for solutions. I ask, however, that those solutions be informed by the perspective of our judges - those who are the ultimate decision-makers - and that you keep in mind that many of the cases heard are exceedingly difficult and emotionally draining. In that regard, the nature of the complaints themselves point out the difficulty. On one hand, the charge is that judges too often remove kids unnecessarily; on the other hand, the charge is that too often kids are not removed soon enough. The fact is, in many cases, the evidence is conflicting - not so much in the determination that the children are subject to harm, but in the determination of who or what is the cause of the harm, and, more importantly, in the determination of how best to prevent the continued harm. I hope you understand why most judges tend to err on the side of protecting the kids.

I speak from my own hard experience as a prosecutor and former juvenile court judge. In those positions, one learns quickly of the unfathomable cruelty that can be inflicted on children. There is outrage against the perpetrators, and anguish and empathy for the victims, and a troubling sense of wonder that such cruelty can exist in our affluent and progressive society. I will not forget the awful details of the last case of child abuse I tried as a prosecutor. A six-year old boy had been locked alone in the basement of a house in Cape Girardeau by the boy's mother and her boyfriend, who then left the house for a weekend jaunt out of state. The basement had carpet, but no furniture, and there were two windows that were too high for the boy to reach, although they allowed him to hear the neighbor kids playing outside. He was given a blanket, a package of Twinkies and a soda, a couple of toys, and nothing else. If you have a sense of pity for the child in that makeshift prison, imagine the horror in his little eyes when the house caught fire. Though the house burned to the ground, a fireman-hero rescued the boy, unconscious and on the verge of death. On the operating table at the local hospital, physicians worked feverishly to resuscitate the boy, extricating gobs of white ash and black soot from his mouth and nose and throat, but as they were bringing him back to life, they were doubly alarmed at his pencil-thin arms and legs and his bloated belly. And sure enough, the secondary diagnosis was "failure to thrive," doctor's jargon for malnutrition. Miraculously, the boy survived and last heard is doing well in a placement overseas with his father's family. The mother was sentenced to time in the county jail, and the boyfriend, the main perpetrator, went to prison.

This case was not typical, but only because of the devastating fire. To the extent that cases can be characterized as typical, they most often involve children living with their unwed mother who is drug-addicted or alcoholic, barely functional and who is frequented by boyfriends who are abusive to her and her children both. In more cases than not, the fathers are unknown, absent, in jail, or are themselves drug-addicted, alcoholic and barely functional. The children in those typical cases are clearly in danger. The salvation is that when the authorities are notified of the situation, and the system works properly, the children will be removed and placed in a nurturing and loving foster-care setting, and the lucky ones eventually will be adopted out.

In many other cases, however, the evidence is equivocal and the dispositions unsure. I recall, in particular, a case I had as a juvenile court judge involving an 18-year old woman - an 18-year-old girl - who already had five children by five different fathers. This is no exaggeration! She was not a drug addict or an alcoholic, nor did she abuse her kids or allow others to harm them, at least physically, and those facts dictated against removing the kids. But her home was a revolving door for boyfriends who were often drugged or drunken, and she and the kids survived on little more than food stamps, Medicaid, and family housing subsidies. She had few parenting skills, just an eighth-grade education, and no relatives she could count on, and, as you would expect, most of the time she was rather desperate. DFS efforts to teach parenting skills and household management were only marginally successful.

Under any conception of "the best interests of the children" - the legal standard by which all court interventions are governed - the children should have been removed. And from time to time, they were removed, and more than once at the request of the mother, herself. The likelihood was that those kids would flourish in most any other environment, and that they would only fail with their mother. But a competing presumption of law in effect at the time of the case required all-out efforts for reunification of the family - which meant that the kids stayed with the mother. Under the law, then as now, kids are to be taken from their homes only if they are abused or neglected, not if the parents are poor and uneducated. And so it was, that for many months, until I left for my new position on the Supreme Court, I supported the rather valiant efforts of the juvenile officers and DFS workers on the outside chance that the young mother might eventually learn to adequately care for her own children.

Late yesterday afternoon, as I was finalizing my remarks, and realizing that my recollection of the young girl's case may be unduly harsh, I called Randy Rhodes, the chief juvenile officer in Cape Girardeau, to check my facts. Randy had been the juvenile officer assigned to the case, and he confirmed that my account of the case was accurate. As we finished the conversation, I asked, in passing, "Whatever happened to the girl?" To my surprise, he said that he saw her just a couple of weeks ago. And he told me this: Ten and a half years, and two more kids later, she is alive and well, she is stable and relatively self-supporting, and she has a job - a full-time job! - a job working for a sheriff's department across the river in Illinois, and even the kids have enjoyed a fair measure of success!

My goodness, how would it be if all the other families like hers fared half so well! But in my experience, unfortunately it is not that way. There are many failures, and the successful preservation of families, at least in the extreme cases like hers, is more the exception than the rule.

I have been on the bench for more than 15 years, and for 10 of those years, I have served on the Supreme Court, hearing the difficult, complex, and immensely important legal issues of the day. But the most difficult cases I have faced are child custody cases in the juvenile and family courts, the cases in which I was required to determine whether to favor one parent over another, or whether to take the kids from both. It was a time in my career that I relied on the sage advice of one of my predecessors in office, Judge Stanley Grimm, who capsulized the law in this unique way: He told me that a judge can take kids only from parents who rate a failing grade, not from parents who rate a D-. Too often, as I learned from the case of the 18-year old woman with five children, the difference between a D- and an F is murky and muddled, but the call must be made, and one hopes and prays that the children will be free from harm and somehow given a fair shake.

From these accounts and countless others like them, I hope you understand that there are so many pitiful and seemingly hopeless cases, cases that simply have no good answers, and that even with all the resources our society has to offer, and even with all the wisdom in the world, mistakes will be made, and tragedies will occur.

Agree with me on this proposition: When mistakes are made and when tragedies occur, the only acceptable response is to redouble our efforts to ensure that, in the future, decisions regarding the fate of our children are indeed made with all the resources we have to offer and all the wisdom we can muster.

Because we judges are the ultimate decision-makers in the cases, it is incumbent on us to take the lead. To that end, and with the blessing and encouragement of Senate President Pro Tem Kinder and House Speaker Hanaway and Governor Holden, himself, I am pleased to announce the formation of a commission composed primarily of judges and legislators, but also including key executive branch officials and other interested parties, to address the concerns raised in the several investigations, to review proposed legislative solutions, and to propose legislative changes of its own. The judges of this state ask that through the work of this commission, they be given input in the legislative process. We ask not to direct any legislation, but only that you hear our concerns, as we strive to hear yours, and we submit to you that the healthy interaction between judges and legislators, between representatives of co-equal branches of government, is the best way to yield the best product for our mutual constituents, our children.

There is precedent for this collaboration. In 1994, there was a crisis in juvenile justice that centered on juvenile delinquency rather than abused and neglected kids. The crisis then was born of a nationwide increase in juvenile crime coupled with the perception and, in some cases, the reality, that kids who committed crimes were going both unpunished and unrehabilitated. Just as today, people were wary of the system because of the secrecy of the proceedings. To meet that challenge, the Court, in cooperation with the General Assembly and the Department of Social Services, formed the Supreme Court Task Force on Children and Families, and just as today, the charge was to review proposed legislation and to propose legislation on its own. With helpful suggestions from the Task Force, the resulting enactments brought into better balance the competing interests of protecting society from juvenile offenders and offering those offenders, because of their tender age, a chance at redemption and rehabilitation. The rules on confidentiality were lifted in the more serious cases to provide for public scrutiny, and the rules for certification of youthful offenders to stand trial as adults were strengthened to make those offenders more accountable. At the beginning of the process, the legislative proposals were, as they say, "all over the board," but the legislation that was enacted was consensus legislation. It was legislation that was hailed at the time and that since has proven its worth. It has brought stability and respect, and has increased the public's trust and confidence in the system. In fact, the juvenile delinquency side of the juvenile justice system and especially the innovative programs of the Division of Youth Services under its longtime director Mark Steward, are among the finest in the nation. It is that performance and reputation that we must bring to the abuse and neglect side of the system. That is the aim of our new commission.

Senator Kinder and Speaker Hanaway are so enthused about the project that they have appointed themselves to the commission! The other members are Senators Bill Foster and Pat Dougherty, and Representatives Bryan Stevenson and Yvonne Wilson. The chair of the commission is Judge John C. Holstein of Springfield, who, as most of you know, is a former judge and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court and, more importantly, is a former judge of the juvenile court in West Plains, Missouri. Judge Holstein, would you please stand? Because time is of the essence, the work of the commission will begin immediately, and I mean immediately! Judge Holstein will meet with the legislative members this very afternoon.

In addition to the work of our joint commission, let me emphasize that much can and will be done outside the legislative process. Specifically, I am directing the judiciary to undertake the following measures:

1. We will prepare and publish a best practices manual for juvenile court judges so that we can implement, throughout the state, what we know that works, and I am pleased to advise you that the first portion of the manual is already in circulation;

2. We will promulgate time standards to ensure the timely processing of abuse and neglect cases;

3. We will ensure that whenever possible, children are placed first with qualified relatives before other alternatives are pursued; and this effort, too, already is being undertaken in every one of our juvenile courts;

4. With the cooperation of DFS, we will provide and mandate cross-training for all juvenile officers and DFS caseworkers and even the judges, themselves, so that everyone within the system knows the processes and personalities of each constituent part of the system; and

5. We will look very seriously at opening our court proceedings, at least to some extent, so that there is a better balance between the need to protect the privacy of children and the need to inform the public and shed light on the system.

Finally, so that your difficult legislative decisions will be as informed as possible, I invite you to participate - no, I urge you to participate - in a symposium for legislators sponsored by the Supreme Court and the Missouri Juvenile Justice Association to be held Monday afternoon, February 3, from 3 to 7 p.m., at a local hotel. In recognition of the immediacy and crucial importance of the juvenile justice issues, the legislative leadership has agreed to call you into session at 2 p.m. on that Monday afternoon, to do the necessary business at hand, and then to adjourn before 3 p.m., so that each of you can attend. Professor Douglas Abrams of the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Law will begin with a brief history of the tragedies and triumphs of Missouri's juvenile courts. A copy of Professor Abrams' new book - "A Very Special Place in Life" - which commemorates the 100th anniversary of the founding of the juvenile courts in this state, will be distributed to you at that time. Four of our juvenile and family court judges will then present the main program, complete with flow charts and handouts of pertinent statutes and an assortment of other useful materials. Each judge will focus on a different part of the system - cases involving abuse and neglect, cases involving what we call "status offenses" (runaways, truants and the like), cases involving juvenile delinquency, and the special extracurricular activities of our judges that are designed to reach children before they need to be admitted to the system in the first place. At 5 p.m., each of you will be assigned to one of six breakout groups organized by geographic region and staffed by your local juvenile court judges and juvenile officers, as well as local DFS, DYS and DMH caseworkers. For the next hour, you will be encouraged to ask questions and offer your suggestions about the system in general and about local implementation in particular. Following the breakout sessions, The Missouri Bar will sponsor an hour-long reception at the hotel to further the networking opportunities for all participants. By engaging in this dialogue and by opening the lines of communication, it is our profound hope, that at the end of the day, we can better respond to your concerns, and thus better serve our children.

To conclude, despite the current challenges, you will learn from Professor Abrams' book that Missouri has become a national leader in many social reforms that have served and continue to serve the best interests of children and, indeed, Missouri boasts a remarkable heritage of leadership and innovation that forms the perfect foundation for our actions today and in the future. To build on that rich heritage, we must cooperate and collaborate. We must find ourselves on the same page. We must have a common understanding of the problems. We must devote our full resources to the solutions. And together, we must win the day for our children.

And why this common commitment? It is because our goal is the same. Our goal is the same! And it is simply this: A safe home, and a loving family, for every child.

Thank you.

On motion of Senator Gibbons, the Joint Session was dissolved and the Senators returned to the Chamber where they were called to order by Senator Shields.

SECOND READING OF SENATE BILLS

The following Bills were read the 2nd time and referred to the Committees indicated:

SB 176--Aging, Families, Mental and Public Health.

SB 178--Ways and Means.

SB 179--Small Business, Insurance and In-dustrial Relations.

SB 180--Education.

SB 181--Financial and Governmental Organi-zation, Veterans' Affairs and Elections.

SB 182--Aging, Families, Mental and Public Health.

SB 183--Transportation.

SB 184--Judiciary and Civil and Criminal Jurisprudence.

SB 185--Aging, Families, Mental and Public Health.

SB 186--Economic Development, Tourism and Local Government.

SB 187--Education.

SB 188--Ways and Means.

SB 189--Small Business, Insurance and In-dustrial Relations.

SB 190--Small Business, Insurance and In-dustrial Relations.

SB 191--Judiciary and Civil and Criminal Jurisprudence.

SB 193--Transportation.

SB 194--Small Business, Insurance and In-dustrial Relations.

SB 196--Pensions and General Laws.

SB 197--Ways and Means.

SB 199--Economic Development, Tourism and Local Government.

SB 200--Financial and Governmental Organi-zation, Veterans' Affairs and Elections.

SB 201--Small Business, Insurance and In-dustrial Relations.

SB 203--Judiciary and Civil and Criminal Jurisprudence.

SB 204--Education.

SB 205--Education.

SB 206--Judiciary and Civil and Criminal Jurisprudence.

SB 208--Economic Development, Tourism and Local Government.

SB 209--Aging, Families, Mental and Public Health.

SB 210--Financial and Governmental Organi-zation, Veterans' Affairs and Elections.

SB 211--Ways and Means.

SB 212--Pensions and General Laws.

SB 213--Judiciary and Civil and Criminal Jurisprudence.

SB 214--Judiciary and Civil and Criminal Jurisprudence.

SB 216--Transportation.

SB 217--Pensions and General Laws.

SB 218--Economic Development, Tourism and Local Government.

SB 219--Financial and Governmental Organi-zation, Veterans' Affairs and Elections.

SB 220--Pensions and General Laws.

SB 221--Commerce and the Environment.

SB 224--Economic Development, Tourism and Local Government.

SB 228--Economic Development, Tourism and Local Government.

SB 232--Economic Development, Tourism and Local Government.

SB 237--Economic Development, Tourism and Local Government.

MESSAGES FROM THE GOVERNOR

The following message was received from the Governor, reading of which was waived:

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

State of Missouri

Jefferson City, Missouri

January 16, 2003

TO THE SENATE OF THE 92nd GENERAL ASSEMBLY

OF THE STATE OF MISSOURI:

I have the honor to transmit to you herewith for your advice and consent the following appointment to office:

Dorsey Alan Baumgartner, 1714 Old Highway 54, Auxvasse, Callaway County, Missouri 65231, as a member of the State Mental Health Commission, for a term ending June 26, 2005, and until his successor is duly appointed and qualified; vice, reappointed to a full term.

Respectfully submitted,

BOB HOLDEN

Governor

President Pro Tem Kinder referred the above appointment to the Committee on Gubernatorial Appointments.

RESOLUTIONS

Senator Gross offered Senate Resolution No. 71, regarding the Fifty-fifth Wedding Anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. Earl W. Wooldridge, St. Peters, which was adopted.

COMMUNICATIONS

President Pro Tem Kinder submitted the following:

January 17, 2003

Mrs. Terry Spieler

Secretary of the Missouri Senate

State Capitol, Room 325

Jefferson City, MO 65101

RE: Appointments to the Joint Committee on Corrections

Dear Terry:

Pursuant to Section 21.440, RSMo 2002, I am appointing the following Senators to the Joint Committee on Corrections:

Senator John Cauthorn

Senator Carl Vogel

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at your earliest convenience.

Sincerely,

/s/ Peter Kinder

PETER D. KINDER

President Pro-Tem



Also,

January 17, 2003

Mrs. Terry Spieler

Secretary of the Missouri Senate

State Capitol, Room 325

Jefferson City, MO 65101

RE: Appointment to the Joint Committee on Capital Improvements and Leases Oversight

Dear Terry:

Pursuant to Section 21.530, RSMo 2002, I am appointing Senator Chuck Gross to the Joint Committee on Capital Improvements and Leases Oversight.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at your earliest convenience.

Sincerely,

/s/ Peter Kinder

PETER D. KINDER

President Pro-Tem



Also,

January 17, 2003

Mrs. Terry Spieler

Secretary of the Missouri Senate

State Capitol, Room 325

Jefferson City, MO 65101

RE: Appointment to the Missouri Arts Council Trust Fund Board of Trustees

Dear Terry:

Pursuant to Section 185.100, RSMo 2002, I am appointing Senator Charlie Shields to the Missouri Arts Council Trust Fund Board of Trustees.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at your earliest convenience.

Sincerely,

/s/ Peter Kinder

PETER D. KINDER

President Pro-Tem



Also,

January 17, 2003

Mrs. Terry Spieler

Secretary of the Missouri Senate

State Capitol, Room 325

Jefferson City, MO 65101

RE: Appointments to the Missouri Children's Services Commission

Dear Terry:

Pursuant to Section 210.101, RSMo 2002, I am appointing the following Senators to the Missouri Children's Services Commission:

Senator Bill Foster

Senator Anita Yeckel

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at your earliest convenience.

Sincerely,

/s/ Peter Kinder

PETER D. KINDER

President Pro-Tem



Also,

January 17, 2003

Mrs. Terry Spieler

Secretary of the Missouri Senate

State Capitol, Room 325

Jefferson City, MO 65101

RE: Appointment to the Missouri Boundary Commission

Dear Terry:

Pursuant to Section 7.200, RSMo 2002, I am appointing Senator Dan Clemens to the Missouri Boundary Commission.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at your earliest convenience.

Sincerely,

/s/ Peter Kinder

PETER D. KINDER

President Pro-Tem



Also,

January 17, 2003

Mrs. Terry Spieler

Secretary of the Missouri Senate

State Capitol, Room 325

Jefferson City, MO 65101

RE: Appointments to Missouri Commission on the Delta Regional Authority

Dear Terry:

Pursuant to House Concurrent Resolution 25 (2002), I am appointing the following Senators to the Missouri Commission on the Delta Regional Authority:

Senator Bill Foster

Senator Harry Kennedy

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at your earliest convenience.

Sincerely,

/s/ Peter Kinder

PETER D. KINDER

President Pro-Tem



Also,

January 21, 2003

Mrs. Terry Spieler

Secretary of the Missouri Senate

State Capitol, Room 325

Jefferson City, MO 65101

RE: Appointment to the Missouri Health Facilities Review Committee

Dear Terry:

Pursuant to Section 197.310, RSMo 2002, I am appointing Senator John Cauthorn to the Missouri Health Facilities Review Committee.

Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have further questions.

Sincerely,

/s/ Peter Kinder

PETER D. KINDER

President Pro Tem

Also,

January 21, 2003

Mrs. Terry Spieler

Secretary of the Missouri Senate

State Capitol, Room 325

Jefferson City, MO 65101

RE: Appointment to the Joint Committee on Economic Development Policy and Planning

Dear Terry:

Pursuant to Section 620.602, RSMo 2002, I am appointing Senator Norma Champion to serve as chairman of the Joint Committee on Economic Development Policy and Planning.

As chairman of this committee, Senator Champion will be charged with assessing the current economic climate in Missouri, including a review of the annual economic report produced by the Missouri Department of Economic Development. It shall also be her duty to plan, develop, and evaluate a long-term economic development policy for the state of Missouri. These processes are necessary to ensure Missouri's competitiveness with other states, to foster job growth and retention in the state, and to guard against future declines in the national and state economies.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at your earliest convenience.

Sincerely,

/s/ Peter D. Kinder

PETER D. KINDER

President Pro-Tem

INTRODUCTIONS OF GUESTS

Senator Dougherty introduced to the Senate, Dr. Larry and Audrey Jones, St. Louis.

Senator Bray introduced to the Senate, former State Representative Tim Van Zandt, Washington, D.C.

Senator Scott introduced to the Senate, the Physician of the Day, Dr. Wayne Morton, Osceola.

Senator Steelman introduced to the Senate, Lindsey and Justice Yates, Richland; and Pat Flynn, Kansas City.

Senator Kennedy introduced to the Senate, Sherman and Catherine George, St. Louis.

Senator Dougherty introduced to the Senate, Addington Stewart, St. Louis.

On motion of Senator Gibbons, the Senate adjourned under the rules.



SENATE CALENDAR

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NINTH DAY-THURSDAY, JANUARY 23, 2003

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FORMAL CALENDAR



SECOND READING OF SENATE BILLS



SB 15-Childers

SB 17-Childers

SB 35-Loudon

SB 44-Dougherty

SB 61-Caskey

SB 65-Goode and Gross

SB 68-Childers

SB 83-Cauthorn, et al

SB 84-Cauthorn and Klindt

SB 91-Coleman

SB 104-Goode and

Dougherty

SB 113-Loudon

SB 115-Dougherty

SB 128-Bland

SB 135-Goode

SB 152-Bland

SB 161-Bland

SB 164-Bland

SB 172-Goode

SB 174-Childers

SB 198-Caskey

SB 202-Childers

SB 207-Mathewson

SB 215-Foster

SB 222-Steelman, et al

SB 223-Foster

SB 225-Klindt, et al

SB 226-Klindt and

Cauthorn

SB 227-Cauthorn

SB 230-Bray

SB 231-Caskey

SB 233-Foster

SB 234-Quick

SB 235-Quick

SB 236-DePasco and Loudon

SB 238-Caskey

SB 239-Mathewson and

Scott

SB 240-Mathewson

SB 241-Yeckel

SB 242-Yeckel

SB 243-Yeckel

SB 244-Russell and Vogel

SB 245-Shields and Bartle

SB 246-Steelman, et al

SB 247-Dolan

SB 248-Gross and Goode

SB 249-Shields and Bland

SB 250-Stoll

SB 251-Childers

SB 252-Steelman

SB 253-Steelman, et al

SB 254-Goode and

Mathewson

SB 255-Kinder

SB 256-Goode, et al

SB 257-Steelman

SB 258-Steelman

SB 259-Steelman

SB 260-Stoll and

Mathewson

SB 261-Clemens

SB 262-Clemens

SB 263-Jacob

SB 264-Shields

SB 265-Shields and Scott

SB 266-Shields and

Kennedy

SB 267-Shields

SB 268-Loudon and Goode

SB 269-Quick

SB 270-Foster and Dolan

SB 271-Jacob

SB 272-Bland, et al

SB 273-Bland, et al

SB 274-Caskey

SB 275-Russell

SB 276-Jacob

SB 277-Jacob

SB 278-Steelman, et al

SB 279-Scott

SB 280-Scott, et al

SB 281-Shields

SB 282-Shields

SB 283-Klindt

SB 284-Loudon

SB 285-Dougherty, et al

SB 286-Dougherty, et al

SB 287-Childers

SB 288-Dolan

SB 289-Dolan, et al

SB 290-Gross and Steelman

SB 291-Caskey

SB 292-Yeckel

SB 293-Vogel

SB 294-Vogel

SB 295-Shields

SB 296-Griesheimer

SB 297-Griesheimer

SB 298-Griesheimer

SB 299-Champion, et al



SB 300-Cauthorn, et al

SB 301-Bray

SB 302-Bray, et al

SB 303-Gibbons

SB 304-Jacob

SB 305-Jacob and Steelman

SB 306-Steelman

SB 307-Steelman

SB 308-Steelman

SB 309-Caskey

SB 310-Caskey

SB 311-Dougherty, et al

SB 312-Dolan, et al

SB 313-Dolan

SB 314-Dolan

SB 315-Steelman

SB 316-Kennedy

SJR 1-Bland

SJR 2-Bland

SJR 3-Gross and Gibbons

SJR 4-Cauthorn

SJR 5-Bland

SJR 6-Bartle

SJR 7-Loudon

SJR 8-Bartle

SJR 9-Yeckel

SJR 10-Yeckel

SJR 11-Bartle

SJR 12-Mathewson and

Goode

SJR 13-Stoll

SJR 14-Jacob