SB 603 Revises provisions relating to child support enforcement
Sponsor: Days
LR Number: 2474S.01I Fiscal Note:
Committee: Judiciary and Civil & Criminal Jurisprudence
Last Action: 2/28/2007 - Second Read and Referred S Judiciary and Civil & Criminal Jurisprudence Committee Journal Page: S366
Title: Calendar Position:
Effective Date: August 28, 2007

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Current Bill Summary


SB 603 - This act modifies various provisions relating to child support enforcement. Under current law, the Child Support Enforcement Division may certify a person who owes a child support arrearage in excess of 5,000 dollars to the appropriate federal agency for denial, suspension or limitation of a passport to such person. This act lowers the arrearage threshold for passport denial certification from $5,000 to $2,500. This act also allows the division to open a corresponding child support case based on another state’s request for assistance.

Definitions for "parent," "dependent child," "obligee," "obligor," and "public assistance" are modified. Among such modifications are adding putative father and legal father into the definition of "parent" and adding the state into the definition of "obligee."

This act also allows the Child Support Enforcement Division to collect past due support owed to the state when a caretaker relative was on assistance or the child was in the custody of the state. The division is also allowed to establish an administrative order against any parent who does not already have an order against them. Under current law, the division can only establish an order if there is no order of support for the child. The division is also allowed to vacate an order which was improperly entered without jurisdiction or due process. Under current law, a court order is needed in order to avoid these orders. This act also specifies that an administrative modification can be made and must be approved by the court to become an enforceable order. If the order is not approved, the matter is then set for trial de novo.

This act also authorizes the Missouri Gaming Commission to direct gambling boats to intercept and pay over gambling winnings to individuals who owe past-due support or state debt, if winnings meet criteria for reporting to the Internal Revenue Service.

This act is substantially similar to HB 936 (2007).

ADRIANE CROUSE