SB 381 Creates and modifies provisions relating to the use of personal information and identity theft
Sponsor: Ridgeway
LR Number: 1569S.01I Fiscal Note:
Committee: Judiciary and Civil & Criminal Jurisprudence
Last Action: 2/28/2005 - Second Read and Referred S Judiciary and Civil & Criminal Jurisprudence Committee Journal Page: S303
Title: Calendar Position:
Effective Date: Emergency Clause

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Current Bill Summary


SB 381 - This act relates to the use of personal information.

Currently, Section 407.1355, RSMo, prohibits a person or entity from publicly posting an individual's Social Security number. This act redefines "public post" to include intentionally communicating or making an individual's social security number available to his or her co-workers. This act also prohibits requiring individuals to use their social security number as an employee number for employment-related activities. Currently, subsection 1 of this section, which includes the provisions of this act, applies to the use of Social Security numbers on or after July 1, 2006. This act makes the subsection effective on the same date as the act.

This act also changes the penalty for identity theft based upon the amount of credit, money, goods, or services stolen or appropriated.

Currently, identity theft which results in the theft or appropriation of credit, money, goods, services, or other property worth more than $500 but not more than $10,000 is a Class C felony. This act makes identity theft involving more than $500 but not more than $5,000 a Class C felony.

Currently, identity theft which results in the theft or appropriation of credit, money, goods, services, or other property worth more than $10,000 but not more than $100,000 is a Class B felony. This act makes identity theft involving more than $5,000 but not more than $50,000 a Class B felony.

Currently, identity theft which results in the theft or appropriation of credit, money, goods, services, or other property worth more than $100,000 is a Class A felony. This act makes identity theft involving more than $50,000 a Class A felony.

This act has an emergency clause.

This act is similar to certain provisions in CCS/SS/SCS/HCS/HB 353 (2005).

SUSAN HENDERSON